How to bake your makeup – The easy hack to keep makeup in place

Gemma Atkinson says she needs to ‘start practicing' makeup

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Baking doesn’t only refer to cakes, biscuits and other desserts – it’s a popular term in the makeup industry. ‘Baking’ your face is when you pat powder on top of your makeup and wait for it to ‘develop’ in order to make your makeup last longer. This hack was invented by members of the drag community, but has become more mainstream in the last decade or so. Express.co.uk chatted to Richard Zuber, Managing Director of Scentsational, to find out how to bake your face.

When you sweat, touch your face or get caught in the rain, your makeup will start to fade away.

Now that pubs and other social establishments are starting to reopen, you’re probably thinking about applying some makeup for your first trip out.

Two things will create a barrier between you and flawless foundation this year: coronavirus face masks and heat.

Summer is approaching and sweaty skin combined with a face mask is a recipe for disaster when it comes to makeup.

Don’t worry, Express.co.uk knows just the trick to stop your base makeup from melting away under your face-covering!

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Baking your makeup is a surefire way to protect your makeup from sweating off or moving.

Richard said: “Baking your makeup might sound like a bizarre notion but it means setting your makeup and patiently allowing it to develop – as you would patiently wait for a cake to rise (in theory!) – with powder.

“This makes your makeup more resilient. It’s also been around for years, with members of the drag community initially discovering its remarkable effects.”

Setting your makeup with powder will allow it to oxidise and set consistently.

The lashings of powder will also absorb any excess oil and help you to avoid any unwanted shininess throughout the day.

Richard added: “It’s also important to note that whilst this technique is called baking, it’ll leave you looking anything but cakey! Instead, your skin will look airbrushed all day long.”

How to bake your makeup

Baking your makeup is really simple, but you’ll need to add about five to 10 minutes to your makeup routine to perfect this step.

One of the most important things to remember is to moisturise before you start your makeup and even think about baking!

Richard explained: “Keep your under-eye area moisturised, otherwise your powder might further irritate dry skin.”

Once you’ve moisturised or applied your primer, Richard recommends using a liquid foundation or concealer instead of a thick mousse-like alternative.

Heavy and matte bases will look too thick and clumpy underneath lots of powder.

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Once you’ve got your makeup done, it’s time to start baking.

Richard explained: “To bake your makeup, you simply apply translucent powder or loose setting powder to your face once your makeup (namely foundation and concealer) has been applied.”

Don’t go easy with the powder, Richard recommends using “a heavy amount of powder in specific areas”.

Everyone’s skin is different, but most of us tend to get oily around our T-Zones (forehead, nose and chin).

Richard said: “Apply the powder to those areas which are particularly prone to becoming oily and areas where your foundation tends to crack or wrinkle throughout the day.”

Wrinkles tend to occur under the eyes and on the forehead, mainly, but you might have a different area that you’re worried about.

Use a fluffy makeup brush and a translucent or lightly tinted setting powder to do the job right.

Find a powder that you don’t mind purchasing again and again because you’ll be using a lot of products every time you bake.

Richard recommends Clinique’s Almost Powder, Max Factor’s Creme Puff Compact Powder, Rimmel’s Match Perfection loose powder, Maybelline’s Fit Me Matte & Poreless powder or Revolution’s Conceal & Fix Setting Powder.

Leave the powder to bake for five to 10 minutes and, when complete, brush off the excess powder.

It is important to be delicate when brushing away the powder. Richard warned: “Be patient and slowly let it fall. If you’re too eager, you might smudge the makeup underneath yourself!”

When it’s time to go to bed or you want to take your makeup off, it’s very important to clean your skin properly.

While baking is harmless and suits every skin type, you need to carefully and effectively remove your makeup to prevent pores from clogging.

People with oily skin or acne-prone skin should double cleanse just to be safe.

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