Royal brooches: Centenary Rose contains 100 diamonds & has sweet connection to Queen’s mum

Edward VIII praises Queen Elizabeth II's reign in 1969

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The Centenary Rose brooch is one of the most valuable brooches in Queen Elizabeth’s jewellery box, featuring a hundred tiny diamonds. Elizabeth inherited the brooch after her mother’s death.

Her Majesty is rarely seen without a brooch on her lapel, often opting to wear one of her jewels with a bright coat or skirt suit.

Queen Elizabeth not only has a vast brooch collection, but it is also one of the most impressive selections in the world.

It is thought that the monarch has up to around 100 brooches, with special ones on regular rotation.

Charlotte White, Head of Design at 77 Diamonds, Europe’s largest online jeweller, commented on the Queen’s much-loved jewels.

She said: “The Queen’s spectacular and extensive collection of brooches spans world-record breaking, historical and sentimental pieces.

“There are several priceless brooches owned by the Queen that are steeped in history and you could say these jewels attest to the sheer wealth and power of the British monarchy.”

Some of Her Majesty’s brooches date back to before Elizabeth was born, while others were given as gifts to the Queen in recent years.

A brooch from the latter category is the Centenary Rose brooch. 

A white stone featuring a pink rose with green leaves, the brooch was given to the Queen Mother to mark her hundredth birthday in 2000.

It was specially commissioned for her birthday and contains a hundred diamonds to celebrate the years she had spent on earth.

The diamonds encircle the white stone and also outline the bow that sits on its top.

The rose on the stone is hand-painted and depicts a Queen Elizabeth Grandiflora Rose.

These roses were bred specially to mark Queen Elizabeth’s coronation in 1953.

The valuable jewel was made by Collins and Sons, according to the Court Jeweller.

The Queen Mother wore the brooch a few times before her death in 2002, most notably for a trip to the ballet in Covent Garden for her 101st birthday in 2001.

Elizabeth inherited the jewel when her mother died in March the following year.

Her Majesty donned the brooch to giver her annual Christmas speech in 2002, which included a tribute to her late mother and sister, Princess Margaret.

Margaret had died in February 2002.

The Queen has also worn the brooch to several royal engagements, such as for a Christmas church service in 2004, and an Easter Sunday service at Windsor in 2007.

In March 2008, she wore the jewel for the annual Commonwealth Day Service at Westminster Abbey.

The Queen has often matched the brooch with pink outfits, making the rose’s bright colour stand out.

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