‘Pandemic fringes’ and ‘isolation bangs’ are trending right now – here’s everything you need to know

As hair salons worldwide are forced to close down amid the coronavirus pandemic and people find themselves with extra time on their hands at home, a trend has started to sweep the nation – the 'pandemic fringe'!

Yes, the 'pandemic fringe' or 'isolation bangs' trend has officially become a thing as those without access to a hairdresser have decided to take matters into their own hands and cut themselves some bangs.

The trend began in the US, but has since journeyed across the pond to the UK with fans taking to social media to share the results.

One woman showed off her new look, writing: “#pandemicbangs baby! Why the hell not?! Who’s with me?”

One London-based writer also shared a snap of her new look on Instagram, captioning it: "Me two years ago: I'll never cut bangs again …this happened #pandemicbangs."

And another person getting involved with the hair hype wrote: "Yesterday I chopped my fringe. Today (day six of working from home and self isolation) I actually put make up on and normal clothes."

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For those wishing to recreate the new craze, hair stylist to the stars, James Johnson, has shared his thoughts on the 'pandemic fringe' hair trend and its popularity, adding that "fringes are always a trend."

Speaking to OK! online he said: "Fringes are always a trend. They’re an accessory you wear everyday and can really help make a look a real statement.

"Bangs as they’re also called, can help describe your style. Wether you’re a Claudia Winkleman full on bold bangs type of lady, or wearing the Bella Hadid, cute, girl next door whispy fringes look, the different cuts help make an impression without the effort!"

When it comes to the 'isolation bangs', professional hair stylist James, who has worked with famous names including Jacqueline Jossa and Ferne McCann, says he "wouldn’t recommend anyone to cut their own hair", but shares his expert tips for those wanting to give their hair the snip.

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James says: "The first step when managing these fringes, is to make sure you only cut when necessary. There are many things we can do whilst in isolation without grabbing the kitchen scissors just yet!

James advises people to use a few simple steps to create the perfect fringe look. Here, he explains the best way to cut…

Step one

Section your fringe off from the rest of your hair first. You should section the hair first in an imaginary line from your parting.

TIP: wet your hair to find a neat section!

Step two

Once you’ve sectioned the fringe and you’ve checked it doesn’t contain any more hair than is necessary, it’s all up to you. Make sure you've just got your fringe hair ready to cut and no other hair is involved.

Step three

To start with, comb all the hair forward and then take a small section, roughly an inch, of hair in the middle of the parting.

Just to be clear, if this is a side parting, still take an inch wide section, still combed forward, still wet, just making sure it’s parallel to where the parting is.

TIP: One inch is roughly the measurement from the top knuckle on your thumb to your thumb tip.

Step four

Making sure the hair is all combed forward, trim the inch wide section you've selected. Cutting the hair piece in small movements and keeping the scissors pointing up, as opposed to one blunt slice across.

You can come in at an angle if you’re feeling something less horizontal and a little more edgy.

Always take it nice and slow, cutting a couple of millimetres off at a time.


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This inch wide piece of hair you've cut becomes your base and marks the length you want your fringe to be. So make sure you’re happy with this length before proceeding to do the rest of the hair.

TIP: Don’t forget, baby steps… you can always cut more off.

Step five

Now it's time to cut the sides of the fringe.

For a more graduated fringe, you want to be aiming to cut a concave, so it becomes shorter in the middle and longer towards the sides. This means cutting the side pieces at a slant symmetrically.

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To check everything is even, separate the fringe in half and hold each side of your new fringe in your fingers at the root. Pull each side down simultaneously all the way to the end and check it's the same length on each side.

They should finish at the same length – if not don’t panic. Just trim the longer side more to match until symmetrical.

Step six

Finally, to check it’s ok, blow-dry the hair again. A round brush is best to do this.

To make your bangs look as natural as possible, you can make a few angled snips at the ends of the fringe.

TIP: For more choppier fringes, gently chop into the hair with a vertical action with the scissors. This will take the weight out of the hair without removing the length.

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