Police Explain What Happened To The Gun That Killed Tupac

For the ones who have conspiracy theories about the mystery surrounding the murder of rapper Tupac Shakur, this update is going to fuel your fire—what happened to the gun used in his death. This case has been one of the most notorious unsolved mysteries in Hollywood history.

Shakur was gunned down in Las Vegas in September 1996, while attending a boxing match with members of his record label, Death Row records. Earlier that evening, Tupac and his entourage were involved in an altercation with a Crips gang member named Orlando Anderson. This stemmed from an alleged robbery of a member of Death Row that Anderson committed.

Along with Anderson being suspected in the murder, there are many other theories surrounding the rapper’s death. Some state it was the label’s president Suge Knight, Bad Boy Records president Sean “Diddy” Combs, and even the LAPD.  Due to Tupac’s outspoken demeanor, any of the theories are a possibility.

Earlier that evening, Tupac and his entourage were involved in an altercation with a Crip gang member named Orlando Anderson.  This stemmed from an alleged robbery of a member of Death Row that Anderson committed.

According to TMZ, a .40 caliber glock was found and tested in 1998. Results proved that this matched the weapon used in the murder. Here is where the conspiracy theorists are going to get a kick. Once ballistics revealed this weapon was a match, it mysteriously disappeared. Neither LVPD or LAPD could verify the location of the weapon. How convenient, huh?

It was later discovered that the weapon was in the possession of the FBI. Upon the location being revealed, one important fact was disclosed. The weapon, that was proven to be a match in the murder of Tupac Shakur had been destroyed.

The weapon supposedly matched other unsolved murders in Las Vegas, so the weapon was transported there by ATF agents in 2006. Once the weapon arrived in Las Vegas, a second ballistics test revealed that it was NOT the murder weapon.

The glock then sat in storage until 2013. As the ATF took inventory, they did not believe there was a need to keep the weapon. Part of standard operations of ATF is to get rid of unneeded guns.

After consulting with Vegas PD, they determined this weapon was one of the unneeded guns. It seems as though this case is nowhere near close to being solved.

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