Stunning flat in development loved by celebs goes on sale for £900K

Four-bedroom flat in a former London psychiatric hospital goes on sale for £900,000 complete with walk-in wardrobe and trendy marble-effect bathrooms

  • Duplex flat is within Princess Park Manor in Barnet, north London, which used to be Friern Hospital 
  • Current residents include Kara Tointon and high profile footballers; former residents include Kimberly Walsh
  • Boasts three marble-effect bathrooms, walk-in wardrobe, terrace and cinema style room with giant love seat

A stunning duplex apartment in a former psychiatric hospital has gone on the market for £900,000.

The four-bedroom flat in Grade II listed Princess Park Manor in Barnet, north London, boasts three marble-effect bathrooms, a large walk-in wardrobe and a terrace overlooking the 30 acres of mature communal gardens.

The Victorian building used to be Friern psychiatric Hospital – formerly known as Colney Hatch Lunatic Asylum – which was converted to residential housing and renamed Princess Park Manor and Friern Village in 1995.

The well-presented ground-floor apartment, currently on the market with Chancellors, boasts a fully fitted, brand new modern kitchen, an en-suite shower room in the master bedroom as well as a Cotswold style bath, and a family bathroom.

The well-presented ground-floor apartment, currently on the market with Chancellors, will appeal to Mrs Hinch fans thanks to its predominantly grey colour-scheme

Within the expansive apartment there’s also a home cinema style room with a giant love seat, perfect for cosying up with a film

A stunning duplex apartment in a luxurious development (pictured) which has attracted a host of celebrities including Harry Styles and Cheryl has gone on the market for £900,000. The Victorian building used to be Friern psychiatric Hospital – formerly known as Colney Hatch Lunatic Asylum

It’s a fashionista’s paradise, with a walk-in wardrobe and a dedicated shoe room with row upon row of footwear. There’s also a home cinema room with a giant love seat, perfect for cosying up in winter with a film.

There are floor to ceiling windows throughout the apartment and a number of original ‘asylum’ features running throughout. The development is home to the longest corridor in Britain; it reportedly used to take a visitor to the original hospital more than two hours to walk the wards.

Within the expansive grounds there are tennis courts and an original water tank, as well as a Nuffield gym and spa, secure parking, a 24-hour concierge and a courtesy bus to nearby shops and the station, where a train ride into Central London takes 20 minutes.

A source told FEMAIL that current residents within the complex include actress Kara Tointon, and a number of high profile footballers.

Famous faces including Woicec Scenzney, Busted, Kimberly Walsh, Sugababes, 5 Seconds of Summer, The Wanted, Dynamo, Jermain Pennant, Wretch 32, Tulisa Contostavlos, Lynda Bellingham, Atomic Kitten, JLS and Artem Chigvintsev are among others believed to have resided at Princess Park Manor.   


There’s a Cotswold style bath in the master suite (left), while original period features dating back to the building’s time as a hospital are present throughout (seen left and right)

The apartment is a fashionista’s paradise, with a generous walk-in wardrobe off the large master bedroom suite (pictured)

It just gets better for fashion lovers – the property also currently has a small room dedicated to shoes, with racks upon racks of footwear

There are floor to ceiling windows throughout the apartment and a number of original ‘asylum’ running throughout; the development features the longest corridor in Britain. It reportedly used to take a visitor to the original hospital more than two hours to walk the wards. Pictured: the marble-effect family bathroom

A source told FEMAIL that current residents within the complex include former Strictly champion Kara Tointon, and a number of high profile footballers. Pictured: a bedroom currently dressed for a child

Within the expansive grounds there are tennis courts and an original water tank, as well as a Nuffield gym and spa, secure parking, a 24-hour conceirge and a courtesy bus to nearby shops and the station, with a train ride into Central London taking 20 minutes. Pictured: another bedroom designed for a child

Famous faces including Woicec Scenzney, Busted, Kimberly Walsh, Sugababes, 5 Seconds of Summer, The Wanted, Dynamo, Jermain Pennant, Wretch 32, Tulisa Contostavlos, Lynda Bellingham, Atomic Kitten, JLS and Artem Chigvintsev are among others believed to have resided at Princess Park Manor. Pictured: a bedroom

The history of Colney Hatch

At its peak, Colney Hatch was occupied by 2,500 mental patients. Pictured: a watercolour by an unknown artist, circa 1855

The original hospital was built as the Second Middlesex County Asylum and was in operation from 1851 to 1993. It was opened on July 17, 1851 by Prince Albert, with William Charles Hood being its first medical superintendent.

The cost of building had been estimated at £150,000, but the final cost actually proved to be £300,000, making it the most expensive asylum ever built, at £240 per bed. 

After the County of London was created in 1889 it continued to serve much of Middlesex and London. During much of this time its smaller prototype, Hanwell Asylum, also operated. 

At its peak, Colney Hatch was occupied by 2,500 mental patients. For much of the 20th century, its name was synonymous among Londoners with any mental institution. 

Extensions built in 1857 expanded its capacity to 2,000 inmates – but by this point there were concerns over serious construction defects, with the walls and rafters visibly separating in one room. Reinforcement works to fix the roof and insufficient foundations took place in 1858.

By 1880, by which point more extensions had been added, the conditions for inmates were poor. In 1896, a temporary building made from wood and corrugated iron was erected to house 320 chronic and infirm female patients in five dormitories – despite warnings from the Commissioners in Lunacy that this would pose a serious fire risk.

Pictured: a drawing dating back to 1853 of entertainment provided for the patients at the ‘Middlesex Country Lunatic Asylum’, Colney Hatch

Perhaps unsurprisingly, it was destroyed by a fire in January 1903, filling 52 women. In its place, seven new permanent brick villas were built. In 1912 a disused carpenters’ shop and stores by the railway siding were converted into additional accommodation for male patients and further extensions were made to staff accommodation in 1927, by which time staff included nine full-time doctors, 494 nurses and 171 probationers.

The asylum was renamed the Colney Hatch Mental Hospital in 1930, following the Mental Treatment Act, and in 1937 a female nurses’ home was built. That same year the hospital was renamed yet again, this time as Friern Mental Hospital.

During WWII, 12 wards were requisitioned for use by the Emergency Medical Service (EMS) to be run by St Bartholomew’s Hospital in the City of London. They were used to accommodate 900 civilian war casualties and the displaced mental patients were redistributed around other wards and to Bexley Hospital in Kent.

In 1941, five villas were destroyed by bombs and 36 patients and four nurses were killed. By 1944, the hospital had 2,557 beds for mental patients and 746 EMS beds.

In 1948 the hospital became part of the newly formed National Health Service. The 1959 Mental Health Act dictated that the word ‘mental’ be omitted from hospital names, so the hospital became known as Friern Hospital.

The hospital was criticised for its number of elderly patients considered ‘not in need of psychiatric’ care during a Committee of Enquiry in 1966, which highlighted the issue of alternative accommodation for pensioners and a lack of social workers.

By 1973 the number of patients had reduced to 1,500, and by 1979 the hospital only had 1,023 beds. In 1989 it was decided that the hospital should close and its patients reintegrated into the community where possible.

It closed in 1993, at which point the building and grounds were sold to Luke and Brian Comer’s Comer Homes in 1995. The building was converted into luxury flats and became known as Princess Park Manor. 

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