Toddler with brain tumour is given just MONTHS to live

‘It feels too unjust’: Parents of a five-year-old girl with a deadly brain tumour launch a desperate bid to raise £300K for last-ditch treatment – and say ‘we owe it to our little girl to try’

  • The Paul family, from Buckinghamshire, are funding treatment for daughter
  • Five-year-old Georgia was diagnosed with inoperable tumour nine weeks ago
  • Her family fear she only has months to live and are desperate for treatment
  • They have launched a crowdfunding appeal to help towards estimated £300k 

A heartbroken family have launched a desperate appeal to fund treatment for their five-year-old daughter who has just months to live after being diagnosed with a brain stem cell tumour.

Georgia Paul, from Oving, Buckinghamshire, has been diagnosed with an aggressive and inoperable brain stem cell tumour requiring cutting-edge intervention that could cost as much as £300,000.

Her distraught parents, Gary and Ruth Paul, described how their ‘world changed forever’ on 20 April when they learned Georgia had a diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), which is classed as incurable, saying: ‘It all feels too unjust’.

Over the last nine weeks, Georgia has undergone four MRIs scans, a brain biopsy and six weeks of radiotherapy but the family have now exhausted all treatment options available on the NHS.

Georgia (pictured with parents Gary and Ruth) has been diagnosed with an aggressive and inoperable brain stem cell tumour that will require cutting-edge intervention

The toddler’s family have launched a desperate appeal to fund treatment for the five-year-old who may have just months to live after being diagnosed with a brain stem cell tumour

The family’s JustGiving page. The fitting of Georgia’s Convection Enhanced Delivery (CED) system is not available on the NHS, and is estimated to cost around £60,000

Georgia’s parents, who have been keeping family and friends up to date on their blog, said: ‘DIPG is an aggressive tumour that interferes with all bodily functions, depriving a child of the ability to move, to communicate, and even to eat and drink. 

‘However, there are therapies out there. They’re experimental in nature, but we’ve researched them endlessly and identified the ones that show promise.


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‘We feel very strongly that we owe it to our little girl to try them. Her quality of life is forefront of our mind, so we won’t put her through endless treatments if she is clearly deteriorating.

‘But right now, she’s improving, and has such a will to live and a love of life, that we are determined to try and save her.

What is Diffuse Intrinsic Pontine Glioma? 

DIPG is a highly aggressive, incurable brain tumour, almost exclusively found in children between four and 12-years-old.

It affects between 20 and 30 children every year in the UK, who survive less than a year on average after diagnosis.

The tumour tends to grow quickly and is more likely to spread to other parts of the brain or spinal cord. 

DIPGs originate in an area of the brain, and more specifically the brainstem, called the pons. 

The pons is an area deep within the lower part of the brain which is responsible for a number of critical bodily functions, such as breathing, sleeping and blood pressure.    

Standard treatment involves palliative radiotherapy, but surgery is rarely an option because of its position in the brain.

Usual chemotherapy treatments have so far proved ineffective. 

From thebraintumourcharity.org 

Georgia with her mum and little brother. Her family, who have been keeping loved ones up to date via their blog, said: ‘DIPG is an aggressive tumour that interferes with all bodily functions, depriving a child of the ability to move, to communicate, and even to eat and drink’

Georgia with her father Gary, who said: ‘There are therapies out there. They’re experimental in nature, but we’ve researched them endlessly and identified the ones that show promise’

Speaking about the five-year-old, Georgia’s parents said: ‘We feel very strongly that we owe it to our little girl to try them. Her quality of life is forefront of our mind, so we won’t put her through endless treatments if she is clearly deteriorating’

‘Without trying these treatments, she has just months to live and she only just celebrated her fifth birthday this week (26th June).’

The first, and perhaps most costly, procedure is fitting Georgia with a Convection Enhanced Delivery (CED) system. 

This is a relatively new technique which allows cancer fighting drugs to pass across the ‘Blood Brain Barrier’, the impenetrable wall that makes treating brain stem cancer so difficult.

This procedure is not available on the NHS, and is estimated to cost around £60,000.

With funding, it is hoped that Georgia can receive transfusions of the chemotherapy drugs that show some promise, as well as using immunotherapy treatments to fight the cancer

If the fundraising campaign is successful, Georgia’s infusions will involve travelling every few weeks to Europe, and are estimated to cost between £6,000 and £20,000 per infusion

Speaking about the crowdfunding campaign for her little girl, Ruth said: ‘Our total estimated costs are in the region of £200,000 to £300,000. We are draining our savings to fund as much as we can, but still have a shortfall’

Georgia’s mother said: ‘Without trying these treatments, she has just months to live and she only just celebrated her fifth birthday this week (26th June)’

Once fitted, Georgia can receive transfusions of the chemotherapy drugs that show some promise, as well as using immunotherapy treatments to fight the cancer. 

These infusions will involve travelling every few weeks to Europe, and are estimated to cost between £6,000 and £20,000 per infusion.

Ruth added: ‘Our total estimated costs are in the region of £200,000 to £300,000. We are draining our savings to fund as much as we can, but still have a shortfall. 

‘People have been so kind and generous already but if you can spare anything at all to help Georgia, we would be so incredibly grateful.’

The family are raising funds for Georgia’s treatment via a JustGiving page 

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