Woman sings musical parody of ‘Scary time for boys’ in wake of Kavanaugh confirmation

Lynzy Lab Stewart is one of the many women who felt an overwhelming sense of frustration in the wake of Brett Kavanaugh’s controversial Supreme Court confirmation.

Stewart, a dance teacher and lecturer at Texas State University, decided to channel her emotions through music, writing a satirical song titled “A Scary Time,” which she played on her ukulele and posted on YouTube.

The song’s title was a response to comments President Donald Trump made last week, before Kavanaugh was confirmed to the Supreme Court but after allegations of sexual assault against Kavanaugh by Dr. Christine Blasey Ford and other women. Trump said it is a “scary time for young men in America,” adding that men are now automatically “guilty until proven innocent.”

The remark touched a nerve with sexual assault survivors nationwide, including Stewart.

“I was angry to hear the president describe these times as ‘scary for men’ with a complete disregard of the struggles we, as women, face on a daily basis,” Stewart told ABC News.

Stewart began her song addressing the everyday difficulties women face. She listed things she cannot do as a woman without fear, like walk to her car late at night while on the phone, use public transportation after 7 p.m., or go to a club to dance with her friends and leave her drink attended.

She also included a line referring to Dr. Christine Blasey Ford’s testimony about her sexual assault with the lyrics, “I can’t speak out against my rapist after 35 years.”

Stewart then follows up with sarcastic sympathy for men: “But it sure is a scary time for boys. Yeah gentlemen, band together make some noise. It’s really tough when your reputations on the line and any woman you’ve assaulted could turn up any time.”

The video garnered millions of views and hundreds of thousands of shares and comments overnight. Celebrities like Mark Ruffalo, Patricia Arquette and Ellen DeGeneres have shared the video on social media.

As the song continues there is a sudden change of tone. “Oh wait, that’s right. It’s not such a scary time for boys. They’ve always had the upper hand, they’ve always had a choice,” Stewart sings.

Using satire as levity, Stewart said she hoped her song “would lift a little bit of the weight” she’s been carrying. She said she does not intend to dismiss men’s struggles with the song, but to “finally legitimize women’s.”

Stewart said she has experienced sexual assault like many of her friends. As a dance teacher she has spent her entire adult life teaching young women and girls, many of whom have confided in her about their own stories of sexual assault.

“We are conditioned early on to believe that it is our responsibility to not get attacked, harassed, or assaulted, when the responsibility and accountability lies solely on the attacker,” Stewart added.

Rape remains the most underreported crime in the country. Around 63 percent of sexual assaults are not reported to the police, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

On average, there are over 320,000 victims of rape and sexual assault in the U.S. each year, according to RAINN, an anti-sexual violence organization. Sexual assault affects people of all genders and ages with women and young girls being the most targeted demographic. RAINN reports that one in six American women has been the victim of rape or attempted rape in her lifetime.

It has been only 48 hours since Stewart posted the video on her personal YouTube page, and she said the attention her song received has been “surreal and very exciting.”
Beyond the support, she said strangers are sharing their own stories with her which “truly is the most rewarding feeling.”

As the song comes to an end, Stewart also urges women to “rise up” and make some noise this Election Day, Nov. 6, stressing the importance of putting words into action and vote.

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