Dreaming of a white Christmas? Here’s where your best chances are for seeing snow on Dec. 25.

The USA's fascination with a white Christmas dates back to 1942. when Bing Crosby first crooned the wistful song in the film Holiday Inn. (Photo: Jeff Goodman, Your Take)

While it’s still a bit early for an exact forecast for Dec. 25, where does history say you should be for your best chance of seeing a white Christmas? 

“Most of Idaho, Minnesota, Maine, upstate New York, the Allegheny Mountains of Pennsylvania and West Virginia, and, of course, the Rockies and the Sierra Nevada Mountains all have a high probability of seeing a white Christmas,” according to the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration.  

“And Crested Butte, Colorado, is just one of about a dozen locations boasting a nearly 100% historical probability of seeing a white Christmas,” NOAA said.

Other locations where snow cover on Christmas Day is a virtual or complete certainty include Crater Lake, Oregon; Steamboat Springs, Colorado; and Marquette, Michigan, according to the Bulletin of the American Meteorological Society. 

(Marquette is a virtual lock once again this year, as the city has a snow depth of 30 inches as of Monday, the National Weather Service said.) 

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Historically, much of northern Minnesota and Wisconsin, most of Michigan’s Upper Peninsula and a large portion of the Western mountain areas have a 90% or better chance of a white Christmas.

Also based on historical averages, some of the biggest cities with the best probability for a white Christmas, according to AccuWeather, include Minneapolis; Green Bay, Wisconsin; Buffalo; and Burlington, Vermont.

Historical probabilities of a white Christmas. (Photo: NOAA)

All except Burlington have snow on the ground as of Monday, the weather service said. 

The National Weather Service defines a white Christmas as having one inch of snow on the ground on the morning of Dec. 25. 

It need not snow on Dec. 25 to fit the Weather Service’s definition of a white Christmas, but some flurries would certainly help put folks in the holiday spirit.

The USA’s fascination with a white Christmas dates back to 1942, when Bing Crosby first crooned the wistful song in the film “Holiday Inn.” Written by Irving Berlin, the song’s lyrics bring out a romanticized image of Christmases past, “just like the ones I used to know.”

A second movie – White Christmas, also with Crosby – came out in 1954.

Despite Crosby’s wishes, only 25% to 30% of the 48 contiguous states are typically snow-covered by Christmas, according to AccuWeather. As of Monday, about 46% of the U.S. (excluding Alaska and Hawaii) was snow-covered. 

Bing Crosby's Christmas songs album. America's fascination with a white Christmas began with the classic song by Bing Crosby. (Photo: Handout)

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