Why one of Qatar's purpose-built World Cup stadiums will be TORN DOWN

Why one of Qatar’s purpose-built World Cup stadiums will be TORN DOWN now that it has hosted its last game of the tournament

  •  One of the stadiums used during the World Cup is already being torn down
  •  Stadium 974 is primarily built from shipping containers and can be reused
  •  The 40,000-seat venue may now be heading to Maldonado, Uruguay
  • Click here for the latest World Cup 2022 news, fixtures, live action and results

Although the World Cup will not be concluded for another couple of weeks, one of the stadiums used to host seven matches during the tournament is already being demolished.

Stadium 974, located near Doha Port, was made primarily from repurposed shipping containers and is capable of being completely dismantled and put back together like Lego after it is no longer needed.

Although the World Cup will not be concluded for another couple of weeks, one of the stadiums used to host seven matches during the tournament is already being demolished

Stadium 974, located near Doha Port, was made primarily from repurposed shipping containers and capable of being completely dismantled and put back together like Lego after it was needed

The unique 40,000 seat venue consists of a modular steel frame and 974 shipping containers – hence the name of the stadium.

Portugal, France, Brazil and Argentina all played at the arena – with the last clash being Tuesday’s round of 16 match between Brazil and South Korea. 

Now the stadium will be completely taken to pieces and moved elsewhere or refashioned into a series of smaller venues.

‘Designing for disassembly is one of the main principles of sustainable building,’ said Urban sustainability and climate expert Karim Elgendy.

‘It allows for the natural restoration of a building site or its reuse for another function.’ 

Portugal, France, Brazil and Argentina all played at the arena – with the last clash being Tuesday’s round of 16 match between Brazil and South Korea (pictured)

The stadium can now be shipped to other countries in need of infrastructure, with reports saying it may be heading to Maldonado, Uruguay, if they are successful with their 2030 World Cup bid.

The idea behind the short-lived venue was intended to address concerns that Qatar was spending billions on white elephants that would have little use after the tournament was over – as has been seen in South Africa, Brazil and Russia.

The idea behind the short-lived venue was intended to address concerns that Qatar was spending billions on white elephants that would have little use after the tournament was over – as has been seen in South Africa, Brazil and Russia

The Qatar World Cup has attracted its fair share of scrutiny over recent months for its treatment of migrant workers who built stadiums and infrastructure for the World Cup.

It is believed that as many as 6,500 migrant workers may have died while preparing Qatar for the World Cup, although the tournament’s organisers claim the figure is just 37, with only three coming from workplace accidents.

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