Your Daily Dose: Wild finishes in sport

A TALE OF TWO GOALKEEPERS, OCT 21, 2017

The penalty shoot-out between Bangkok Sports Club and Satri Angthong was in sudden death at 19-19 when Bangkok’s goalkeeper stepped up to take his spot kick.

He hit the woodwork, prompting wild celebrations from his opposite number. Seconds later, the Satri Angthong stopper was racing back to his goal but he could not prevent the ricocheted effort from hitting the back of the net. Satri Angthong missed their next penalty to send Bangkok into the Cup final.

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BOOSTED TO BRONZE, AUG 23, 2018

The Singapore quartet of Hoong En Qi, Samantha Yeo, as well as sisters Quah Jing Wen and Ting Wen thought they finished fifth in the women’s 4x100m medley relay at the Asian Games. Their time of 4min 9.65sec put them behind Japan (3:54.73), China, South Korea, and Hong Kong (4:03.15).

But China and South Korea were disqualified for illegal changeovers, bumping Singapore up to third. Jing Wen said: “I don’t think I’ve ever seen two teams or two swimmers disqualified in a heat or final… We did get our medal, not through preferable ways but it’s definitely a step forward for our women’s team.”

A TITLE BID STALLED, NOV 2, 2008

For 38.9 seconds, Felipe Massa celebrated winning his home race at Interlagos and becoming the Formula One world champion.

He had just enough points to win his first championship with Ferrari. Going into the Brazilian Grand Prix, Lewis Hamilton had a seven-point lead and had to finish fifth or better but was sixth.

Then at the last corner of the last lap of the last race of the season, the McLaren driver overtook Toyota’s Timo Glock and crossed the line to win his first title.

Watch: bit.ly/3c5fooN

BIZARRE TO A FAULT, SEPT 12, 2009

The final shot of Serena Williams’ US Open title defence was a second serve that landed well inside Kim Clijsters’ service box.

With the American down 5-6, 15-30 in the second set, a line judge called a foot fault, giving Clijsters match point in the semi-final.

Williams then verbally abused the line judge, resulting in a point penalty and ending the match.

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SHARING GOLD, FEB 12, 2014

Before the women’s downhill at the Sochi Games, there had been 134 events in 78 years of alpine skiing at the Winter Olympics. Not one of them finished in a gold-medal dead heat. Outright victory was looking good for Swiss Dominique Gisin after she completed the 2.7km course in 1min 41.57sec. But 13 competitors later, Slovenian Tina Maze charged through the finish line in… 1min 41.57sec.

Maze was delighted to share gold with Gisin, who reached the top of the podium after nine knee operations. She said: “Better to be two on top than one to be one-hundredth behind. Two happy faces!”

Watch: bit.ly/2L4mGNs

HE AIN’T HEAVY, SEPT 18, 2016

Alistair Brownlee was in contention to win the World Triathlon Series in Cozumel, Mexico. So was his younger brother at one point. Jonny led with 700m left when he started to weave across the course.

The 26-year-old stopped but Alistair, third, put his arm around Jonny and carried him before pushing him over the line. Jonny was second, 18 seconds behind South African Henri Schoeman.

Watch: bit.ly/35yNoXU

PHOTO FINISH, AUG 1, 1992

In the 100m women’s final at the 1992 Barcelona Olympics, American Gail Devers crossed the line in 10.82 seconds. She won gold. Jamaican Merlene Ottey crossed the line in 10.88sec. She was fifth.

In the same event in Atlanta four years later, Ottey won silver in 10.94. The winner? Devers in 10.94.

Watch: bit.ly/2xB2cJ8

LE TRIOMPHE, JULY 23, 1989

American Greg LeMond started the final stage of the Tour de France 50 seconds behind Laurent Fignon. The two riders were never separated by more than 53 seconds throughout the three-week event.

After 3,000km, the title came down to the final 25km. LeMond zipped from Versailles to Paris in 26min 57sec, beating Fignon by eight seconds – the narrowest winning margin in the Tour’s history. His average speed was over 54kmh – the fastest for a time trial in the competition by about 5kmh.

“It took me three days to get back on my feet,” wrote Frenchman Fignon in his autobiography We Were Young And Carefree. “But when I write ‘get back on my feet’ that’s just a manner of speaking. Because you never stop grieving over an event like that.”

Watch: bit.ly/3ffVsRU

CARNOUSTIE CATASTROPHE, JULY 18, 1999

All Jean van de Velde needed was a double bogey at the last hole of the Open Championship in Carnoustie for his first Major golf title.

A wayward drive, rolled trousers at Barry Burn, and a seven-foot putt for a triple-bogey seven later, the journeyman secured his place in a play-off with Paul Lawrie and Justin Leonard. Scot Lawrie, who started Sunday 10 strokes behind the Frenchman, would complete the biggest final-round comeback in Major championship and PGA Tour history.

Watch: bit.ly/2W4BxxF

LOSE SOME, WIN SOME, MAY 14, 1995

Blackburn Rovers went into the last day of the 1994-95 Premier League season two points ahead of Manchester United. A loss at Anfield coupled with a United win at West Ham would deny Blackburn their first top-flight title in 81 years.

Liverpool snatched a 2-1 victory following Jamie Redknapp’s free kick in stoppage time. But at Upton Park, Hammers goalkeeper Ludek Miklosko produced save after save to earn the hosts a 1-1 draw. Since then, seven Premier League trophies have been lifted on the final day, but none by the losing side.

Watch: bit.ly/2W5Fq5B

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