Afghan interpreter who worked with Aussie troops is executed

Shocking betrayal of brave Afghan interpreter who worked with Aussie troops as he’s EXECUTED and his family left in ‘extreme danger’ – as the extraordinary reason he was left stranded is revealed

  • Afghan army officer who worked with Australian forces has been executed
  • Interpreter and family had desperately been attempting to secure visa to Aus 
  • Family’s lawyer revealed to ABC on Wednesday that Taliban had executed him
  • The family are still in hiding and in ‘extreme danger’ waiting for Australian visa 

A brave Afghan army officer who worked with the Australian Defence Force as an interpreter has been executed by the Taliban – with his terrified wife and children in ‘extreme danger’ and pleading to be evacuated to Australia.

The father had been desperately trying to secure a humanitarian visa for himself and his family since the Taliban’s recapture of Afghanistan after the withdrawal of US troops in August. They had missed the first round of evacuations because they had not been told by Australian authorities they were eligible. 

But his sister, who lives in Australia, has revealed through the family’s lawyer on Wednesday her brother was recently executed. 

‘It was only two days ago his sister called me… and said: “They finally found him and they executed him”,’ Sydney lawyer Shahri Rafi told ABC Radio National.

An Afghan interpreter and former army officer has been executed by the Taliban while attempting to secure a humanitarian visa for himself and his family back to Australia. Pictured: Australian troops at at Patrol Base Samad, Afghanistan, in 2011 

The Taliban made it a priority to execute anyone who had helped their enemies, with interpreters in their firing line. Above, a Taliban fighter stands guard at a checkpoint in the Wazir Akbar Khan neighbourhood in the city of Kabul in August, 2021

The victim worked for years as an officer in the Afghanistan army before assisting Australian soldiers serving in the country. 

‘The family were not told about the Australian government’s emergency evacuation process, so he was not included the process, unfortunately,’ Ms Rafi said. 

‘He’s executed now, and the family are in a desperate situation and they are not the only ones. They got in touch with me thinking that…I may know of different avenues that they haven’t tried.   

‘Unfortunately the family is now in extreme danger and in hiding… we lost a human being who served and helped the Australian army and the Afghanistan army.’ 

The ABC reported the family have looked at other ways to secure the humanitarian visa, including contacting Australian soldiers he worked with in Afghanistan to support their application.

The father was not told of the Australian government’s plans to evacuate embassy workers and interpreters after the terrorist organisation recaptured the country. Pictured: Coalition forces in Kandalay village in 2011 

A lawyer for the family said she was first contacted after they discovered too late he was eligible for the emergency evacuation process the Australian government were carrying out. Australian Army soldiers are pictured in Afghanistan back in 2008 

However, after reaching out to the ADF, they were told they would not disclose the details of his former colleagues and close associates for safety reasons.  

‘[His family] called the ADF on multiple occasions and each time ADF told them that because of confidentiality reasons we cannot disclose this,’ Ms Rafi said. 

The murdered interpreter’s family remain in hiding waiting to see if the Australian government will evacuate them after the Taliban made it a priority to execute anyone who assisted their enemies.

Immigration Minister Alex Hawke has vowed to continue getting Afghans who worked alongside Australian forces safely out of Afghanistan. 

Mr Hawke did not want to comment on the interpreter’s case due to security concerns but he said the government was still working to get people out of the Taliban-controlled country safely.

‘It’s a hideous equation for people in Afghanistan, people are rounded up as they try to escape,’ Mr Hawke told ABC Radio National on Wednesday.

‘We’re using every lever we have in the international community.’

A senate committee was told last week more than 26,000 applications had been made to the federal government from Afghan nationals looking to flee the country.

In August, the government announced 3000 humanitarian places would be allocated to Afghan nationals, out of the 13,750 allotted in the annual program.

Mr Hawke said the situation in Afghanistan remained dangerous.

‘Australia is working closely with partners around the world to do whatever we can to help whoever was left behind,’ he said.

There were 4100 people who were evacuated in August following the Taliban takeover, with two-thirds women and children.     

In August a desperate father who claims to have worked as a security guard at the Australian embassy in Kabul revealed he was hiding inside his house with his family in fear of being executed by the Taliban.

The man, known as Ismail, told ABC News he worked in Australia’s Afghanistan embassy for seven years until the terrorist organisation reclaimed the city. 

Ismail said he won’t answer knocks at his door after locals told him the Taliban had lists and were urging residents to dob in anyone who worked for foreign countries. 

‘Our lives are in danger. We have to be a priority of the Australian Government,’ he told ABC National Radio.

A desperate father who worked as a security guard at the Australian embassy in Kabul (pictured) revealed he was hiding inside his house with his family in fear of being executed by the Taliban

Ismail says he won’t answer knocks at his door after locals told him the Taliban are urging residents to dob in anyone who worked for foreign countries. Pictured: Taliban fighters stand guard along a roadside in Kabul after reclaiming the city in August 

Ismail, who at the time of the interview was bunkered down inside his home with his wife and four children and is too frightened to even step into his yard, says he doesn’t care what happens to him but wants protection for his family.

‘I don’t care if the Taliban find me, if they cut me, I don’t care,’ he said. 

‘But if they do something with my wife, that will be a bad shame for me and my family.’

Prime Minister Scott Morrison said in a press conference in August that Australia would assist in the evacuation of officials, translators and fleeing Afghanis but admitted rescue efforts would be limited.   

‘I want you to know that we will continue to do everything we can for those who have stood with us, as we have to this day,’ he said.

‘But… despite our best efforts, I know that support won’t reach all that it should. 

‘On-the-ground events have overtaken many efforts. We wish it were different.’

Ismail said Mr Morrison’s comments left him ‘very disappointed’ and is pleading for the Government to help the people who have risked their lives for Australian government officials.

Scott Morrison said in a press conference that Australia would assist in the evacuation of officials, translators and fleeing Afghanis but admitted his rescue efforts will be limited

He called on Mr Morrison and other world leaders to stop talking about supporting war-torn nations and start acting with mass rescue efforts

‘It breaks my heart into many pieces and left me very disappointed,’ he said. 

‘As a human he has to think first. People who worked on the front line and put themselves in danger to protect your mission.

‘To support your mission in Afghanistan. To support your property, to support your kind.’

He called on Mr Morrison and other world leaders to stop talking about supporting war-torn nations and start acting with mass rescue efforts.

‘If the Australian Government doesn’t speak for human rights and doesn’t help us in Kabul, tragedy and very bad things will happen here at the hands of the Taliban,’ Ismail said.  

It is not known if Ismail is still alive. 

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