Brexit news latest – Government tells schools to consider STOCKPILING long-life food in case of no-deal shortages

THE Department for Education has told schools to consider stock-piling long life food in case a no-deal Brexit leads to shortages.

On the same day that Boris Johnson warned it was "far from certain" the UK would get a deal, the DfE upated its guidance to schools.

Warning of "food supply chain changes" in the new year after the UK's Brexit transition period ends on December 31, schools were told to consider ordering products with a longer shelf life — such as frozen foods, or ones stored safely at room temperature – before January 1.

They were also been told to consider varying “the timing and number of deliveries to allow for transport delays”, and to be as flexible as possible with delivery slots.

Thankfully the news comes as Britain's chief Brexit negotiator Lord Frost told Boris Johnson to expect a Brussels trade deal early next week, possibly Tuesday.

However, talks could still collapse over fishing and red tape, with both sides urging the other to “get real”.

Follow our Brexit live blog for all the latest news and updates…

  • Dan Keane

    BREAKING: LORDS VOTES FOR AMENDMENT TO INTERNAL MARKET BILL

    The House of Lords has voted 367 for, 209 against amendment 1 on the common frameworks process of regulatory alignment across the UK.

    More follows.

  • Dan Keane

    UK 'MUST BURY MYTH THAT WE MIGHT CONSIDER BREACHING INTERNATIONAL LAW'

    Tobias Ellwood, Conservative chairman of the Commons Defence Select Committee, has said that the UK must “bury the myth that we might consider deliberately breaching international law”.

    Mr Ellwood told the Commons: “When it comes to re-establishing greater Western resolve, 2021 could be a big year for the United Kingdom as we host Cop26 and we take on the presidency of the G7.

    “But this can only happen if we secure a trade deal with the EU, if we protect our overseas aid budget, if we complete a costed Integrated Review and if we bury the myth that we might consider deliberately breaching international law.”



  • Dan Keane

    DOWNING ST SAYS AUSSIE TRADE DEAL 'IN PROGRESS'

    Downing Street today confirmed that a post-Brexit trade deal with Australia was “in progress”, following comments from trade adviser and Australian ex-PM Tony Abbott that an agreement could be reached by Christmas.

    A No10 spokesperson said today: “We are already working closely with our Australian friends to secure a deal, which will be of benefit to both us and them.

    “Round 2 of the negotiations took place from the 21 Sept to the 2 Oct. They were productive, and we continue both to make progress.”

  • Dan Keane

    FISHERMEN WARN NO DEAL COULD REIGNITE 'COD WARS'

    Irish fishermen claim that a no-deal Brexit could reignite “cod wars” between Britain and Iceland across the EU.

    Seán O’Donoghue, chief executive of the Killybegs Fishermen’s Organisation, told The Times: “We’ve had the Icelandic Cod Wars in the past.”

    The 'Cod Wars' erupted between the UK and Iceland in the Fifties, as the two countries squabbled over fishing rights – resulting in Iceland extending its territorial waters to 200 miles.

    He said that no-deal Brexit “would be similar to that”, adding: “If we end up in a no-deal scenario, there would be chaos on 1 January. The immediate effects would be felt in 24 to 48 hours.

    “There would be conflicts, blockades, and there won’t be one EU member state involved, there would be several.”

  • Dan Keane

    LABOUR CLAIM NORTHERN IRELAND BUSINESSES 'ANXIOUS' OVER POST-BREXIT FUTURE

    The UK Government has left Northern Ireland businesses suffering “frustration, anxiety and fear” due to Brexit uncertainty, Labour has said.

    Shadow Northern Ireland secretary Louise Haigh told the Commons that “thousands of businesses still do not know the bare basics” of the trading regime at the end of the year, while Northern Ireland minister Robin Walker said the Government is helping traders “prepare for the end of the transition period”.

    Mr Walker added: “We continue our work to implement the Protocol in a pragmatic and proportionate way that minimises the disruption to people's day-to-day lives and preserves the gains of the 22 years since the Belfast Good Friday Agreement was signed.

    “We're helping traders to prepare for the end of the transition period. We've published business guidance in August and are updating it all the time as arrangements are finalised.”

    He added: “We've established the trader support scheme backed by £200 million of Government funding, with more than 7,000 businesses now signed up and hundreds more joining them every day.”



  • Dan Keane

    WELSH MINISTERS WANT CONTROL OF EU AID REPLACEMENT

    The Welsh government claims it should be free control its share of a forthcoming “Shared Prosperity Fund” (SPF) which will replace EU grants.

    The Tories claim that Labour has failed to make the most from the billions of pounds of EU funding received by Wales since 2000.

    But in new proposals published today, Labour ministers in Cardiff insist that the UK government should set a “policy agenda”.

    However, they stress that Westminster should then allocate all funding “in full” to Cardiff, and give the Welsh government full autonomy over its SPF share on a multi-annual basis”.

  • Dan Keane

    UK ORDERS A THIRD MORE COVID VACCINES THAN THE EU

    The UK Government has ordered more coronavirus vaccines per capita than any other country in the world – almost a third more than the EU.

    According to the latest data, Brits are set to have around 5.4 doses each on offer, which with a population of 66 million means there will be around 5.4 doses per person – including children.

    Meanwhile, the EU has ordered around 3.8 doses per capita after countries in the union joined forces to order vaccines, according to data from Deutsche Bank.

  • Dan Keane

    EU ENGAGING IN 'WRECKING TACTICS' OVER BREXIT, SAYS TORY MP

    Conservative former minister Sir Christopher Chope accused the EU of engaging in “wrecking tactics” over Brexit negotiations.

    He asked the Minister for Northern Ireland Dan Walker: “Does he agree that it's very disappointing that the European Union continues to engage in wrecking tactics which are both in breach of its duty of good faith and its duty of sincere co-operation?”

    Mr Walker responded: “Well, he is absolutely right to draw attention to those duties, we continue to engage in good faith and we hope that these issues can be resolved with the joint-committee in a way which shows that both parties have done so.”



  • Dan Keane

    MPS PRESS GOVT TO DEVELOP IMPLEMENTATION PERIOD

    MPs pressed the UK Government to develop an implementation period to help Northern Ireland businesses deal with changes caused by Brexit.

    The SNP's Alyn Smith (Stirling) raised concerns over the risk of “organised crime focusing on Northern Ireland” because of the lack of preparation, adding: “This just isn't ready yet. Northern Ireland needs an adjustment period – are there preparations for that?”

    Northern Ireland minister Robin Walker said he did not recognise the situation described by Mr Smith, adding that the protocol would deal with issues raised.

  • Shayma Bakht

    MINISTER SAYS MORE DETAILS ON AGRIFOOD PRODUCERS WILL BE ANNOUNCED

    Robin Walker, the junior minister for Northern Ireland, told parliament further details should be announced shortly on support for agrifood producers in the wake of Brexit talks.

    “There remain important outstanding issues to be resolved in discussion with the EU,” he said.

    “For example, we are seeking specific solutions to supermarkets and on the classification of which goods are in genuine and substantial risk of entering the EU market, through the joint committee.”

  • Shayma Bakht

    NORTHERN IRELAND SAYS BREXIT DEAL IS NEEDED TO AVOID 'CRIME BONANZA'

    Northern Ireland's Justice Minister has urged that a Brexit deal be agreed, warning of a potential “organised crime bonanza”.

    Naomi Long described “huge uncertainty” for justice agencies with just weeks to go until the end of the transition period.

    She said: “It isn't just the future security partnership that affects policing and justice in Northern Ireland, it is also the economic decisions that are made because if we have increased differentials in terms of tariffs and other issues around the border, then we will end up with a potential bonanza for organised crime.”

  • Dan Keane

    BLACKFORD CLAIMS UK HEADED FOR 'EXTREME BREXIT'

    Mr Blackford also claimed that Scotland has “been completely ignored by Westminster”.

    He added: “We now face an extreme Brexit, a power grab and another round of Tory cuts all being imposed against our will by a Tory government that we didn't vote for.”

    It came after the PM allegedly said that Scottish devolution was a “disaster”.

    But Boris Johnson hit back: “I think what has unquestionably been a disaster is the way in which the Scottish National Party have taken and used devolution as means not to improve the lives of their constituents, not to address their health concerns, not to improve education in Scotland, but constantly to campaign for the break-up of our country.”

  • Dan Keane

    IAN BLACKFORD SLAMS BORIS' DEVOLUTION COMMENTS

    SNP Westminster leader Ian Blackford said the Prime Minister's comments this week about devolution were “not just flippant remarks”.

    Mr Blackford told the Commons: “His attack on devolution wasn't just a slip of the tongue, it was a slip of the Tory mask.

    “The chasm between Westminster and the Scottish people has never been bigger.

    “We know that these were not just flippant remarks when Scotland faces the biggest threat to devolution with the Tory power grab bill.”

  • Dan Keane

    ABBOTT: UK IS RIGHT TO PRIORITISE DEALS WITH COMMONWEALTH COUNTRIES

    Tony Abott said the UK was right to prioritise post-Brexit deals with Commonwealth countries like Australia, Canada and New Zealand, as well as the US, given the difficulties with the EU.

    “Given the goodwill that continues to exist between Britain and the countries of the Commonwealth I think it is important to make the most of that, to utilise it as far as is possible, particularly if there is not always that much goodwill at the moment between Britain and the EU.”

  • Dan Keane

    TONY ABBOTT: BREXIT TRADE DEAL WITH AUSTRALIA COULD BE FINISHED BY XMAS

    Former Australian PM and trade adviser Tony Abbott has said that a trade deal between the UK and Australia could be finished by Christmas.

    Addressing the International Trade Committee today, he said both sides are “eager” to get a deal done as soon as possible.

    He said: “I know that on both sides there is an eagerness to try and get the Australian deal done before Christmas.

    “And I hope that in the next negotiating sessions both sides are prepared to put all their cards on the table so that the best possible deal can be hammered out.”



  • Dan Keane

    BREAKING: UK AND EU 'IN LAST MOMENTS' TO REACH TRADE DEAL

    Britain and the European Union are in the last moments to reach a trade deal that would regulate their relationship after Britain's transition period ends on Jan 1, 2021, the EU's Trade Commissioner Valdis Dombrovskis said today.

    Mr Dombrovskis would not speculate about any deadlines for ending the trade talks, saying the only deadline that could not be moved was Jan 1, 2021, when Britain's transition period after its exit from the EU earlier this year ends.

  • Dan Keane

    REDWOOD RAGES AT EU'S 'DOUBLE STANDARDS'

    Sir John Redwood has accused the EU of double standards during ongoing trade talks.

    He told Brexit Watch: “We make our own decisions on the matters that are essential to our sovereignty and the exercise of our freedoms under Brexit.”

    “I think in a way the European Union has repudiated the withdrawal agreement and the political declaration which was a parallel important statement of the two parties at the same time.”

  • Dan Keane

    BREAKING: STARMER REMOVES WHIP FROM CORBYN

    Keir Starmer has refused to let Jeremy Corbyn come back as a Labour MP after Jewish politicians threatened to quit.

    It means the ex-Labour leader won't be allowed to sit on the Labour benches despite being reinstated to the party last night.

    Sir Keir said this morning: “I have taken the decision not to restore the whip to Jeremy Corbyn.

    “I will keep this situation under review.”

    Read our full report here.



  • Dan Keane

    COPS WARN OF 'OPERATIONAL IMPACT' AFTER BREXIT

    Police have warned that the UK will lose access to EU databases used millions of times a year, and say this could cause a “major operational impact”.

    In a letter to parliament’s Home Affairs Committee, National Police Chiefs’ Council chair Martin Hewitt said: “The loss of some or all of the tools will mean that, even with contingencies in place, the fallback systems will be slower, provide less visibility of information/intelligence and make joined-up working with European partners more cumbersome.”

  • Dan Keane

    UK-MEXICO TRADE TALKS HIT STANDSTILL

    Trade talks between the UK and Mexico have reportedly hit a standstill, raising fears of a hike in tariffs.

    Politico reports that Britain is unlikely to strike a deal with the North American country, as sources said that talks had reached an impasse.

    This could negatively impact the British automative sector, which would be hard hit as exports of cars and trucks to Mexico, worth £160m, would face 20pc tariffs.

    The Telegraph reports that last year, the UK imported £50.2m worth of parts, components and accessories from Mexico.

  • Dan Keane

    ECB SAYS THAT UK-BASED BANKS MUST MOVE STAFF TO EUROZONE AFTER BREXIT

    The European Central Bank today claimed that UK-based banks looking to continue doing business in the euro zone after the Brexit transition period must move staff to the continent.

    The ECB, which supervises the euro zone's biggest banks, said that lenders operating in the bloc must move sufficient capital, staff and management expertise.

    “Banking Supervision has provided flexibility where required, notably to account for the impact of the lockdown measures and travel restrictions on the relocation of staff,” the ECB said in a newsletter.

    “No additional flexibility is foreseen in principle.”

  • Dan Keane

    'THIS COULD GO ON UNTIL XMAS', DAVIS SAYS

    Former Brexit chief negotiator David Davis says that Brexit paralysis could last “until Christmas” as both sides attempt to overcome differences on fishing and a “level playing field”.

    He told the Telegraph: “The truth is this is going to go on until Christmas because if they come to an agreement before then someone like the French fishermen will kick up a fuss.

    “The deal will be done at the last minute and there will be some sort of freeze after January 1 until the deal is ratified by the EU member states.”



  • Dan Keane

    SCHOOLS TOLD TO BUY LONGER LIFE FOOD

    Schools have been advised by the government to consider buying longer life shelf good products to “minimise the effect” of supply chain disruption due to Brexit.

    SchoolsWeek reports that new guidance issued today states it is “important for all schools, FE colleges and local authorities to prepare for potential changes to food supplies so they can minimise the effect on pupils and young people in their care”.

    It adds that schools may need to “consider whether changes are necessary”, including “ordering longer shelf life products during this period, such as frozen foods or foods that can be safely stored at room temperature”.

  • Dan Keane

    'PREPARE FOR CHANGE'

    Elsewhere in Ireland, foreign minister Simon Coveney has told firms to prepare for a “fundamental change” at the end of the year in a thinly veiled hint towards a no-deal scenario.

    He told a conference hosted by AIB: “My message to businesses would be very clear, plan for a fundamental change at the end of this year.

    “Hopefully the disruption can be limited somewhat by future relationship agreements.”

  • Dan Keane

    SOME IRISH FIRMS 'HAVEN'T THOUGHT THROUGH' BREXIT IMPLICATIONS

    More than two-thirds of Irish businesses in the construction, agriculture, forestry and fishing sectors that usually trade with the UK have not yet registered for customs in advance of Brexit, the Irish Times reports.

    Garry Harahill, of Revenue, said that some firms had “to thought through the implications at all” despite a possible no-deal Brexit on the horizon.

    He said: “There is evidence that some businesses have made little or no plans to manage the negative impacts of Brexit.

    “Businesses who have not prepared for Brexit or who have not yet fully completed or thought through their preparations will be immediately impacted.”

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