Kangaroo found in national park with arrow sticking through its head

Kangaroo found in a national park with an arrow sticking through its head is euthanised after wildlife officers were unable to remove it without causing unbearable pain for the marsupial

  • A kangaroo was shot in the head with an arrow in Canunda National Park, SA
  • The animal was euthanised after staff said removing the arrow would be painful
  • Killing of an animal is a maximum fine of $50,000, or four years’ imprisonment

A kangaroo that was shot in the head with an arrow had to be euthanised after the arrow was unable to removed without causing pain to the animal.

The kangaroo was found by a visitor at Canunda National Park, in South Australia, last week, ABC News reported.

National Resources South East (NRSE) Lower South East district manager Ross Anderson said National Parks SA staff assessed the damage to the kangaroo. 

The kangaroo tragically had to be euthanised after staff concluded that removing the arrow would cause unbearable pain for the already-suffering marsupial.

The kangaroo was found by a visitor at Canunda National Park, in South Australia, last week

‘The damage inflicted by the arrow was too great to have been able to heal properly, and the kangaroo would have been in a great amount of pain,’ Mr Anderson said.

‘Unfortunately we had to euthanise the kangaroo.’

In response to the unfortunate euthanisation of the kanagaroo, the NRSE reiterated the harsh penalties individuals can face if they were to kill or injure an animal.  

Under the Animal Welfare Act in South Australia, a person who is found to have killed or injured an animal faces a maximum fine of $50,000, or four years’ imprisonment.

Under the National Parks and Wildlife Act, individuals face a $2,500 and six months jail under the National Parks and Wildlife Act. 

Carolyn Jones from RSPCA SA told ABC that they received five or six reports about animals being injured by arrows or crossbow bolts.     

‘We are appalled by these incidents, which cause enormous pain and suffering to animals,’ she said.  

The kangaroo unfortunately had to be euthanised after staff assessed the damage and concluded it would cause a lot of pain for the animal

 

 

 

 

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