Lost ‘Atlantis’ village reappears from its watery grave

Heatwave raises lost ‘Atlantis’ village from its watery grave, 80 years after it was deliberately flooded to create a Cumbrian reservoir

  • Hidden ruins submerged under Haweswater Reservoir in Cumbria are again emerging from he watery depths
  • Blisteringly hot heatwave has seen much of the reservoir, which supplied Manchester wither water, dry up 
  • Mardale Green was rarely seen since disappearing in 1935 when valley was flooded to make was for reservoir 

A village long-submerged under a massive reservoir is again slowly emerging from its watery grave.

Mardale Green, in Cumbria, has rarely been seen since disappearing in 1935 when the valley was flooded to make way for Haweswater Reservoir. 

Hundreds of villagers were evicted from their homes and most of the buildings were blown up by Royal Engineers who used them for demolition practice. 

Marsdale last emerged from the watery depths of the reservoir during a heatwave in 2014. 


Mardale Green, in Cumbria (left in the 1930s) has rarely been seen since disappearing in 1935 when the valley was flooded to make way for Haweswater Reservoir


Hundreds of villagers were evicted from their homes and most of the buildings were blown up by Royal Engineers who used them for demolition practice


Remnants of the ghostly village is again reappearing as water levels drop dramatically amid the summer’s sweltering heat. Shocking pictures show how much of the reservoir – which supplies Manchester with its water – has dried up

 


The remains of the ancient structures, including farm gates and tree stumps, have now been revealed beside the receding waterline. Left: The village church before it was destroyed to make way for the reservoir 


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But the ghostly village is again reappearing as water levels drop dramatically amid this summer’s sweltering heat. 

Shocking pictures show how much of the reservoir – which supplies Manchester with its water – has dried up. 

And stone-by-stone, the remnants of the Mardlae Green are slowly emerging from the depths.   

The remains of the ancient structures, including farm gates and tree stumps, have now been revealed beside the receding waterline.

Mardale Green was considered one of the most picturesque villages in Westmorland, Cumbria, and many people thought it should be left alone.


Mardale Green was considered one of the most picturesque villages in Westmorland, Cumbria, and many people thought it should be left alone

When the Haweswater Dam was built, it raised the water level by 95ft (29 metres) and could hold 84 billion litres of water.

The dam created a reservoir 4 miles (6km) long and around half a mile (600 metres) wide. Its wall measures 1,541ft (470 metres) long and 90ft (27.5 metres) high.

It was considered to be an engineering feat in its time, built from 44 separate sections, joined together with flexible joints.

While the actual buildings that made up the village are no more, traces of the Mardale Green can still be seen, including these stone walls 

The reservoir today supplies about 25 per cent of the North West’s water needs. It is fed by various streams and aqueducts from Swindale, Naddkle, Heltondale and Wet Sleddale

It was considered to be an engineering feat in its time, built from 44 separate sections, joined together with flexible joints

The reservoir today supplies about 25 per cent of the North West’s water needs.

It is fed by various streams and aqueducts from Swindale, Naddkle, Heltondale and Wet Sleddale.

There was a public outcry at the time of its construction. Mardale Green was considered one of the most picturesque villages in Westmorland, Cumbria, and many people thought it should be left alone.

Lake District writer and walker Alfred Wainwright lamented the passing of the old valley. He wrote: ‘Mardale is still a noble valley. But man works with such clumsy hands!

‘Gone forever are the quiet wooded bays and shingly shores that nature had fashioned so sweetly in the Haweswater of old; how aggressively ugly is the tidemark of the new Haweswater.’

Today, thousands of visitors flock to see its ruins laid bare by receding waters in the years of drought. 

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