Science Museum removes display featuring fake penis and chest binders

Science Museum removes trans inclusive ‘Boy or Girl’ display featuring fake penis and chest binders after complaints it was ‘propaganda’ and not biology

  • Science Museum removes Boy Or Girl? exhibit after complaints were lodged
  • The gallery had featured a fake penis and controversial chest-binding equipment
  • Quotes from a transgender person also described being ‘born in the wrong body’
  • Museumgoers had accused the feature of peddling ‘propaganda’ over science 

The Science Museum has taken down a trans-inclusive display featuring a fake penis and chest-binding equipment after complaints were lodged over its contents.

The sex and gender gallery describes transitioning from the ‘wrong body’ as a ‘hero’s journey’ and gender characteristics as ‘difficult to define’ and not always in line with ‘your biological sex’.

Quotes from a transgender person were also included that described being ‘born in the wrong body’ – a concept that trans groups are increasingly distancing themselves from.

Several museumgoers, including Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne, accused the Boy Or Girl? feature of peddling ‘propaganda’ over biology, reports the Telegraph.

The controversial sex and gender gallery describes transitioning from the ‘wrong body’ as a ‘hero’s journey’ and gender characteristics as ‘difficult to define’ and not always in line with ‘your biological sex’

The Science Museum (above) has taken down a trans-inclusive display featuring a fake penis and chest-binding equipment after complaints were lodged over its contents

The now-empty display featured a fake penis, a controversial compression vest to flatten the chest and hormone-inducing testosterone patches.

Baroness Nicholson wrote to the museum’s chairman, Sir Ian Blatchford, to argue the Boy Or Girl? gallery ‘promotes social and medical transition in a way that is not neutral’. 

The exhibit also contains an information panel which states gender ‘is more difficult to define’ than sex. 

It goes on to say: ‘Your gender identity is your sense of yourself as male or female, or, for some people neither or both. It may not match your biological sex.’

Quotes from a transgender person named ‘Alex’ who described being ‘born in the wrong body’ were also included in the cabinet.

Millions of people visit the free-to-enter Science Museum each year, many of them schoolchildren visiting for educational tours. 

In a 2016 blog post, former head of exhibitions and programmes, Alex Tyrrell responded to a brewing online row over the controversial Boy Or Girl? display.

‘The thinking behind Who am I? – and the sex and gender display in particular – was to communicate the latest research clearly and accurately, but we also believe that featuring contributions from other viewpoints and disciplines is essential when examining a question as complex and profoundly personal’, he wrote.

‘The idea of Who am I? was always to raise questions. We present issues in ways that provoke debate, however we would never want to compromise the accuracy of the content on display.’ 

Several museumgoers, including Baroness Nicholson of Winterbourne, accused the Boy Or Girl? feature of peddling ‘propaganda’ over biology

Scientists were also left confused over a ‘sex-o-meter’ included in the exhibit that could apparently reveal whether a person’s brain is male or female. 

Researchers were left questioning its scientific value, while others took to social media to slam its ‘antiquated gender stereotypes’.

Dr Joseph Devlin, head of experimental psychology at University College London, told CNN he was ‘surprised’ at the exhibit. 

He said: ‘The Science Museum has an impressive track record and I really respect their work in science communication. This particular exhibit is not at all representative of the work they do.’ 

The Science Museum was contacted for comment. 

It comes as storms descend over Westminster and Holyrood as a furious row continues to brew over Nicola Sturgeon’s controversial gender law.

MPs lined up to support Scottish Secretary Alister Jack in the Commons yesterday as he laid out the reasons for wielding an unprecedented veto over the SNP’s gender identity shake-up.

Mr Jack said the decision was not taken ‘lightly’ but Westminster could not accept the ‘adverse’ impact on UK-wide equalities law.

Ms Sturgeon has warned it is ‘inevitable’ that she will seek a judicial review of the move, branding it a ‘full-frontal attack’ on Holyrood.

Critics have accused the First Minister of seeking a ‘constitutional fight’ to gain political ground as she continues to wage Scotland’s independence campaign. 

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